Tag Archives: Navy

9-14 May 2016 Maritime Security Events

This is a roundup of maritime security and national security events that our readers and members might find interesting. As CIMSEC has a global presence, our events list reflects events from around the world. Inclusion does not equal endorsement – those bolded are most apparently related to maritime security. See one we missed?  Email our Director of Operations at operations@cimsec.org.

CIMSEC May 18th Meet-up at Archipelago

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9-14 May 2016 Maritime Security Events

09 May 2016 – Philippines Presidential Election

10 May 2016 – Washington, DC – CSIS – “The State of Defense Acquisition”

10 May 2016 – Canberra, Australia – ANU – “Is the Taiwan Strait still a flash point?”

11 May 2016 – Washington, DC – The Heritage Foundation – “The National Security Implications of Rapid Access to Space”

11-12 May 2016 – Singapore – ACI – “Maritime Security Management” 

11-15 May 2016 – Portland, Maine – Maritime History Conference” 

11-20 May 2016 – New York – UN IMO Maritime Safety Committee Meeting

12 May 2016 – Washington, DC – The Heritage Foundation – “Helping Secure Asia’s Future through Enhanced U.S.-India Defense Partnership”

13 May 2016 – Washington, DC – Defense Entrepreneurs Forum – “DEFxDC”

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Long-Range Maritime Security Events

16-18 May 2016 – Washington, DC – Navy League – “Sea, Air, Space Symposium”

20 May 2016 – Taiwan’s Presidential Inauguration

24-27 May 2016 – Vientiane – ASEAN – 10th ADMM 

26-27 May 2016 – Ise-Shima, Japan – G7 Summit

June-July 2016 – Hawaii – Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Naval Exercise 

June 2016 – Baltic Sea – BALTOPS Naval Exercise

03-05 June 2016 – Singapore – IISS – “Shangri-La Dialogue” 

06-07 June 2016 – Lisbon – G7++ Friends of Gulf of Guinea Meeting

13-15 June 2016 – Ontario, Canada – Queens University – “Engagement Between Peace and War:
How Soldiers and Military Institutions Adapt”

13-15 June 2016 – Newport, RI – USNWC – “Naval Strategist Forum and Current Strategy Forum” 

19-24 June 2016 – Hawaii – U of Hawaii– “International Coral Reef Symposium” 

20-22 June 2016 – Gdansk, Poland – “BaltMilitary Expo”

21 June 2016 – Kiel, Germany – “Maritime Security Challenges and the High North” 

23 June – 02 July 2016 – Aspen, CO – Aspen – “Aspen Ideas Festival”

23 June 2016 – Washington, DC – Booze Allen/CSBA – “Directed Energy Summit 2016” 

27-28 June 2016 – New York City – ICAS/UVA/UN – “Legal Order in the World’s Oceans: UN Convention on the Law of the Sea”

5-7 July 2016 – Norfolk, VA – NATO C2COE – “C2 in Emerging Warfare – Challenges to the Alliance and Coalitions” 

July 2016 – Yaounde Meeting and Operationalization of Interregional Coordination Center (ICC) for Maritime Safety and Security in Central and West Africa

27-30 July – 02 July 2016 – Aspen, CO – Aspen – “Aspen Security Forum”

01-04 Aug 2016 – Aspen, CO – Aspen – “Roundtable on Artificial Intelligence”

02-04 Aug 2016 – Everett, WA – Maritime Security West 2016

08-09 Aug 2016 – Venice, Italy – WASET – “International Conference on Port and Maritime Security”

09-12 Aug 2016 – Hawaii – East-West Center – “North Pacific Arctic Conference on Arctic Futures”

Sep 2016 – Thailand – ASEAN – ADMM-Plus Military Medicine and Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief Exercise (AM-HEx)

Sep 2016 – Panama – UNITAS Naval Exercise

Sep 2016 – Newport, RI – USNWC – International “Seapower Symposium”

06-09 Sep 2016 – Hamburg, Germany – SMM – “International Conference on Maritime Security and Defense”

07 Sep – Micronesia – Pacific Islands Forum

15-16 Sep 2016 – Washington, DC – State Dept. – Our Ocean Conference 2016 

25-28 Sep 2016 – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – International Sociological Association – “Transformations of the Military Profession”

Oct 2016 – Southeast Asia – U.S. Navy – SEACAT Naval Exercise

Oct 2016 – Indian Navy, U.S. Navy, JMSDF – Malabar Naval Exercise

03-06 Oct 2016 – Vancouver, Canada – Navy League of Canada – “Maritime Security Challenges 2016”

15 Oct 2016 – Lome, Togo – AU – AU Regional Conference: Maritime Security and Development in Africa

17-21 Oct 2016 – Paris, France – “EuroNaval 2016”

01-02 Nov 2016 – Kuala Lampur, Indonesia- “13th Annual Maritime Security and Coastal Surveillance Conference”

02-05 Nov 2016 – Jakarta, Indonesia – IndoDefense Expo 2016”

13-16 Nov 2016 – Auckland, NZ – ASEAN – ADMM-Plus Maritime Security Exercise: Exercise Mahi Tangaroa

21-25 Nov 2016 – New York – UN IMO Maritime Safety Committee Meeting

29 Nov-02 Dec 2016 – Vino del Mar, Chile – “ExpoNaval 2016”

Dec 2016 – Expiration of EUNAVFOR Operation Atalanta and NATO’s Operationa Ocean Shield Counter-Piracy Mandates 

14-15 Jan 2017 – New York City – SMM – “2017 TELOS Conference: Asymmetrical Warfare – The Centrality of the Political to the Strategic” (Call for Papers Deadline: 31 July 2016)

03-05 Oct 2017 – Mumbai, India – SMM – “INMEX“

Sea Control 117 – Niger Delta Pirates Declare War?

seacontrol2Niger Delta violence returns as oil prices plummet and both the Nigerian government’s ability and willingness to pay off former militants decreases. As the Nigerian Navy moves to counter this new violence, a largely unknown group called the “Niger Delta Avengers” has responded by “declaring war” on the Navy. Dirk Steffen, who recently published a CIMSEC article on this development, joins us to discuss the current situation in the Gulf of Guinea, the militant threats, government capabilities & intentions, as well as the methods and background of these pirate operations. 

This is not the podcast to miss! It won’t make you an expert like Dirk, but he’ll have given us enough information to pretend to be one by the end of the podcast.

DOWNLOAD: Niger Delta Pirates Declare War?

Sea Control 114 – South China Sea with CAPT James Fanell

seacontrol2For a discussion on the South China Sea, Sally DeBoer, our Book Review Editor, brings in CAPT James Fannell (USN, Ret), the former Director of Intelligence and Information Operations (N2) for the US Pacific Fleet.  During the course of his thirty year career, CAPT Fanell specialized in Indo-Asia Pacific security affairs, with an emphasis on the Chinese navy and its operations. CAPT Fanell is an experienced public speaker noted for his candor and expertise. He is currently a government fellow for the Geneva Center for Security Policy and the author of Red Star Rising.

Download this week’s episode here!

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Pakistan’s Navy: A Quick Look

By Alex Calvo

Traditionally the junior service, operating in the Army’s shadow and receiving a ten percent share of the 2015 defence budget of $6.6 billion, Pakistan’s Navy personnel numbers more than 22,000 active, plus 5,000 in the reserve. This secondary role stands in contrast with the economy’s dependence on the sea, with the port city of Karachi contributing 25 percent of GDP and the proposed China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) raising the country’s maritime profile even further.

Much of the Navy’s backbone, including its seven submarines, five French-made ‘Khalid’ class conventional hunter-killer (SSKs) acquired in the 1990s plus two ‘Hashmat’ class SSKs from the 1970s, is nearing retirement. The Navy is working to acquire new surface and undersea combatants, boosting domestic shipbuilding in the process and in cooperation with Beijing.

Plans include procuring an additional four 3000-ton F-22P/’Zulfiqar’ (Sword) class frigates with improved sensors and weapons (including HQ-17 surface-to-air missiles, developed from Russia’s Tor 1/SA-N-9), as well as six Type-022 Houbei stealth catamaran missile boats. State-owned shipbuilder Karachi Shipyard and Engineering Works (KSEW) is responsible for these programs, and is expanding its facilities with a new foundry, manufacturing areas, and two dry docks of 26,000 and 18,000 dead weight tons, spread over 71 acres. Islamabad had been hoping to procure six Perry-class frigates from the US on easy terms, but congressional hostility has prompted greater reliance on China, a country heavily committed at all levels to Pakistan, being a key to Beijing’s strategy of securing access to the Indian Ocean and keeping New Delhi distracted by a regional rival.

Sword class frigate of the Pakistani Navy.
Sword class frigate of the Pakistani Navy.

Karachi is the traditional home of the Pakistani Navy, and remains of the utmost importance, despite diversification into other bases, among them PNS Siddique (in Turbat, in the south-west, close to the strategic deepwater port of Gwadar and the border with Iran), Pasni, and Jinnah Naval Base (also in the south-west). Asked whether security is considered by the Pakistani Navy as a reason to push for further diversification away from the city, Zoha Waseem (PhD Candidate at King’s College London and an expert in Pakistani security and policing) explains that “the situation in Karachi in terms of the ongoing operation is linked with the need of the military to keep investing in Karachi. The construction of military bases, infrastructure, and training centres and accommodation does not appear to be decreasing. Karachi is an ATM machine, and a prime location for any stakeholder to have its assets here.”

PNS Badr, a British-built Type-21 frigate, was decommissioned in 2014. Despite being the junior service and the country facing a difficult fiscal position, Pakistan's Navy has been pushing for ambitious plans in terms of both surface and undersea combatants. Source Flickr.
PNS Badr, a British-built Type-21 frigate, was decommissioned in 2014. Despite being the junior service and the country facing a difficult fiscal position, Pakistan’s Navy has been pushing for ambitious plans in terms of both surface and undersea combatants. Source Flickr.

While new ships are seen as essential in terms of maritime security and the fight against piracy, it is Pakistani plans to acquire new submarines that have met with the greatest concern in New Delhi. In March 2015, Islamabad announced plans to procure eight new Chinese submarines, and in October 2015 confirmed that four would be purchased from Beijing and four built at KSEW. The package includes a training centre in Karachi and probably includes access to China’s Beidou-II (BDS-2) satellite navigation network. Thanks to similar designs, Beijing, in turn, gets to enjoy the necessary maintenance personnel and facilities enabling her to operate her own submarines much more efficiently in the Indian Ocean, home to vital SLOCs (sea lanes of communication) for China. Ideally the Navy would like a total of 12 new boats. These Chinese-designed submarines will probably be based on the air independent propulsion (AIP) equipped Type 39B Yuan SSK (known as S-20 in its export version). Displacing 2,300 tons, they can fire both cruise missiles and 533 mm torpedoes, and can also deploy mines and special forces. Pakistan, already working on a version of the National Defence Complex Babur missile capable of launch from her old Khalid submarines, sees the S-20 as more than a conventional platform, although preventing an Indian blockade is certainly a major goal in and by itself. A sea-based deterrent would provide Islamabad with a second strike capability, while avoiding perceptions of falling behind India in the nuclear sphere. The resulting improvement in survivability is seen by Mansoor Ahmed (Stanton Nuclear Security junior faculty fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center), as providing greater strategic stability to South Asia, given that India could not be sure of completely destroying Pakistani nuclear forces and thus escape unacceptable damage herself.

Work on a sea-based deterrent may also be closely linked to the Navy’s status within the military. According to Scott Cheney-Peters (US Navy reserve officer and CIMSEC founder) “Unless Pakistan’s Navy can develop an at-sea strategic nuclear deterrent it is likely to remain the ‘junior service.’ This means it has a strong institutional incentive to pursue an SLBM second-strike capability. But just as this incentive may not be enough to bring the capability to fruition any time soon, so the second-capability may not be enough to remove the perception of the Navy as a junior partner in the nation’s armed forces.”

Alex Calvo is a guest professor at Nagoya University (Japan) focusing on security and defence policy, international law, and military history in the Indian-Pacific Ocean Region. A member of the Center for International Maritime Security (CIMSEC) and Taiwan’s South China Sea Think-Tank, he is currently writing a book about Asia’s role and contribution to the Allied victory in the Great War. He tweets @Alex__Calvo and his work can be found here.

Featured Image: MAYPORT, Fla. (Aug. 31, 2010) Pakistan sailors parade their country’s colors during the decommissioning ceremony of the guided-missile frigate USS McInerney (FFG 8) at Naval Station Mayport. During the ceremony, McInerney was commissioned into the Pakistan navy as PNS Alamgir (F 260). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gary Granger Jr./Released).