Category Archives: Events

Upcoming Lectures, Meet-ups, Happy Hours, Discussions, Symposia, Conferences

SpiderKellys

DC Chapter’s April Meet-Up

Spider Kelly's

Join our DC Chapter for our April DC-area informal meet-up/happy hour.  We will be meeting at Spider Kelly’s by the Clarendon metro stop.  We hope you’ll join us for a night of interesting people and interesting discussion.

Time:   Wednesday, 23 Apr 5:30-9pm
Place:   Spider Kelly’s
3181 Wilson Blvd.,  Arlington VA 22201
Clarendon Metro (Orange Line)

All are welcome – RSVPs not required, but appreciated: director@cimsec.org

books

Time to Win Some Books!

Between the 17th and 24th of March, Offiziere.ch as well as the Facebook pages “Sicherheitspolitik” and Army HQ will hold another security policy contest with the support of “Seidlers Sicherheitspolitik“, “Aussen- und Sicherheitspolitik“, #carbine, and CIMSEC.

Figure of a giant “aircraft carrier” that was to be built in the Second World War by the British from a rather unusual building material.

This time, our security policy contest will deal with a historical maritime theme.

During the Second World War, Britain’s land-based combat aircraft lacked sufficient range to attack German submarines in the middle of the Atlantic. A British journalist and inventor working for the British Combined Operations Headquarters, who was already known for his unusual ideas, suggested the construction of giant floating landing platforms (“aircraft carrier”) on which planes could land and take off. A prototype was tested on a lake in Canada. The proposed construction material was unusual, but it was available in sufficient quantities and at an unbeatable price. A boat that was also made from this material can be seen in the image below.

rumpelstielzchen-004

Questions
What material was the “aircraft carrier” made of?
What was the project name of this venture?
Who suggested the project to Winston Churchill?

The (hopefully correct) answers should be sent to einsatz@offiziere.ch. The preferred prize can also be specified in the e-mail, although we cannot guarantee this.

Prizes
The prizes will be drawn from among the correct entries. They will first be drawn from among the entries answering all three questions correctly. If nobody manages this (don’t disappoint me!), the draw will be made from the entries that have two correct answers.

2 x “Soldaten, Guerilleros, Terroristen” by Philipp Knesebeck (gesponsert von Springer VS).
1 x “Global Environmental Change” by Achim Maas, Balázs Bodó and Clementine Burnley.
1 x “Life Begins at Incoporation” by Matt Bors.
1 x “Shadow Wars: Chasing Conflict in an Era of Peace” by David Axe
1 x “Vier Tage im November” by Johannes Clair.
1 x “Poor Numbers: How We Are Misled by African Development Statistics and What to Do about It” by Morten Jerven.
1 x “Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety ” by Eric Schlosser.
1 x “Cyber War will not take place” by Thomas Rid.
1 x “New Security Challenges in Asia” by Michael Wills and Robert M. Hathaway.
1 x “Schottenfreude: German Words for the Human Condition” by Ben Schott.
1 x “Europa als sicherheitspolitischer Akteur” by Michael Staack and Dan Krause.

Future Rethinking Seminar: Current National Security Challenges & Opportunities

April 17, 2014

ADM James Stavridis, USN (ret)

Dean, The Fletcher School, Tufts University
Current National Security Challenges & Opportunities
Marriott Residence Inn, Pentagon City 6:00-8:00PM
Admiral James Stavridis, (USN, ret) is currently the Dean of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.  While on active duty, he led the NATO Alliance in global operations from 2009 to 2013 as Supreme Allied Commander Europe. Previously, he served as Commander of U.S. Southern Command from 2006-2009, with responsibility for all military operations in South and Central America. He also served as the Senior Military Assistant to the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of the Navy, and was the first Commander of the Navy’s “Deep Blue” strategic and tactical think tank after the 9/11 Pentagon attacks. a graduate of the Fletcher School’s PhD program, Dr. Stavridis has published five books and over one hundred articles. His current focus is on innovation, strategic communcations and planning, and creating security through international, interagency, and public/private partnerships in the turbulent 21st century. (Biography)
For the Rethinking Seminar, Dean Stavridis will be discussing topics related to:
     • National Security Challenges potentially including:
          o Terrorism / extremism
          o Proliferation of weapons of mass destruction
          o Rogue nations
          o Regional hegemons (e.g. China/Iran) and the emergence of anti-access/area-denial capabilities, and
          o The growing threat to net centric warfare C3/ISR systems
     • National Strategic Opportunities including:
          o Phase 0 activities
          o U.S. presence in the Mid East and Western Pacific
          o Joint and international training / exercises
          o Partnering, building relations and military to military contacts
          o Military, diplomatic, economic (foreign internal defense) support to host nations
Register Online for this event.
REGISTRATION TIPS: 
 
Forgotten User ID: If you are already a registered user but have forgotten your User ID (which may be your email address), contact the Rethinking Coordinator.
Forgotten Password: The online system will provide you a new password should you require it from a link on the Registration page.
New Users: If you did not receive this message directly, you can register for an event by first establishing a short profile at www.jhuapl.edu/rethinking.  You will also automatically receive announcements about future events.
SEMINAR SPECIFICS:
Cost: None for the Seminar
Location: Marriott Residence Inn, 550 Army-Navy Drive, Arlington, VA (Pentagon City) Directions, map and parking info.
Supper: A sandwich buffet is available 30 minutes before each Seminar on a first-come basis.

 

PAST SEMINARS:

Video, audio, presentation and bulletized note files of past seminars remain available on the Rethinking Seminar Series website www.jhuapl.edu/rethinking under Video Archives (for the current series), Past Series, and Speakers tabs.  Videos from recent Rethinking Series years are also available on the JHU/APL YouTube Channel Rethinking Playlist.

Future Rethinking Seminar – State of Global Terrorism: Potential US Counterterrorism Policy and Strategy

Thursday, March 27th 2014
Professor Bruce Hoffman
Georgetown University
State of Global Terrorism:

Potential US Counterterrorism Policy and Strategy

Marriott Residence Inn, Pentagon City
6:00-8:00pm

Register Online for this event.

Professor Bruce Hoffman has been studying terrorism and insurgency for more than thirty years. He is currently Director of the Center for Security Studies, Director of the Security Studies Program, and a tenured professor at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. Professor Hoffman previously held the Corporate Chair in Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency at the RAND Corporation and several other leadership positions within RAND. Between 2004 and 2006 Professor Hoffman was Scholar-in-Residence for Counterterrorism at the Central Intelligence Agency. During 2004 and 2005 he was also an adviser on counterterrorism and counterinsurgency to the:

  • Office of National Security Affairs, Coalition Provisional Authority, Baghdad, Iraq;
  • Strategy, Plans, and Analysis Office at Multi-National Forces-Iraq HQ, Baghdad; and
  • Iraq Study Group.

Professor Hoffman is also a member of the National Security Preparedness Group, the successor to the 9/11 Commission. (Biography)

For the Rethinking Seminar talk, Professor Hoffman will discuss the state of global terrorism today and what US counterterrorism policy/strategy should be going forward. His talk will include topics such as:

  • Al Qaeda (AQ), its history, its current status,
  • How AQ has morphed from a global entity with consolidated Command and Control into many more regionally focused groups,
  • Whether those regional groups are more concerned with local issues and actions rather than attacking the “far enemy” a.k.a. the U.S. and the West, and
  • The implications of these and other issues for US counterterrorism policy/strategy, particularly in a declining national security budget environment.
Register Online for this event.
REGISTRATION TIPS: 
 
Forgotten User ID: If you are already a registered user but have forgotten your User ID (which may be your email address), contact the Rethinking Coordinator.
Forgotten Password: The online system will provide you a new password should you require it from a link on the Registration page.
New Users: If you did not receive this message directly, you can register for an event by first establishing a short profile at www.jhuapl.edu/rethinking.  You will also automatically receive announcements about future events.
SEMINAR SPECIFICS:
Cost: None for the Seminar
Location: Marriott Residence Inn, 550 Army-Navy Drive, Arlington, VA (Pentagon City) Directions, map and parking info.
Supper: A sandwich buffet is available 30 minutes before each Seminar on a first-come basis.

 

PAST SEMINARS:
Video, audio, presentation and bulletized note files of past seminars remain available on the Rethinking Seminar Series website www.jhuapl.edu/rethinking under Video Archives (for the current series), Past Series, and Speakers tabs.  Videos from recent Rethinking Series years are also available on the JHU/APL YouTube Channel Rethinking Playlist.
CSIS

US Secretary of the Navy Talks LCS, Partnerships, and the Future of the USN

Last Friday the Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus, participated in the latest Military Strategy Forum discussion organized by the DC-based Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Ever vigilant, CIMSEC dispatched a fearless one-man delegation to the discussion. Below are some of the highlights of the event with the SECNAV.

With a few topics off the table, including the situation in Ukraine and the ongoing fiscal year 2015 budget negotiations, the central theme of the discussion revolved around the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) and its future. In contrast with the speech made by the Secretary of Defense on 24 February, the SECNAV presented a more optimistic view of the contested vessel design and its prospects. By 2016, four LCS are expected to be on extended deployment. The Secretary further argued that the LCS should continue to be built through the current five-year defense plan, and, once complete, that further decisions should be taken based on the ship’s record, taking in account the costs of replacing it. As the LCS is only now beginning operational tests, there is no reason why the next flight of the LCS should not be modified. The Secretary cited the example of the subsequent flights of the DDG 51 and the Virginia class attack subs, which differ greatly from the original design. However, if modifications ultimately prove inadequate, the LCS will have to be replaced.

The second topic of discussion centered on the future of the U.S. Navy’s ‘Rebalance to the Pacific.’ The branch plays a crucial role, as it can brings presence and capabilities to regions in a way that the Army or Air Force cannot without more permanent basing or training agreements. However, according to the SECNAV, in order to ensure presence the Navy needs four elements: People, platforms, power, and partnerships. All are important, but none more so than partnerships. The United States relies on information provided by its partners, and fused from a variety of sources. That requires constant communication, relationships, trust, and familiarity. It is therefore crucial that the United States should reassure its partners in the Asia-Pacific that its rebalancing towards the region is real. To this end, the share of the fleet in the Pacific will increase from 55% to 60% by the end of the decade, and the contingent of Marines in Darwin, Australia, will grow to 1000 over the course of this year. Significantly for those keeping an eye on Washington’s rebalancing to the Pacific, the SECNAV emphasized that their role will not be restricted to training with Australian forces, but will include greater engagement in that part of the world.

The third, and perhaps key, point of Friday’s event focused on the future of the U.S. Navy in general, along with the sustainability of its current size and operational capacity. Secretary Mabus is convinced that the Navy’s size will reach 300 ships by the end of the decade, and that once reached the number will be sustainable. He did, however, add that the era of unlimited budgets, common a decade ago, has come to an end. Despite emerging constraints, he believes a combination of measures can cut costs and keep a 300-ship Navy afloat in the long term. This includes relying on mature technology (and crucially, not forcing expensive immature tech on new ships), disciplining requirements to keep them somewhat constant, fixed-price contracts, greater transparency in procurement, and relying on stable and tested designs. Here, the decreasing prices of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyers was cited as an example to emulate; as an increase in bids from two to three ships per year cut unit costs, without sacrificing quality. Other measures include increasing the share of biofuel used by Navy ships, for which the branch is cooperating with the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy. Here, the U.S. “fracking revolution” will likely not prove much help, as oil and gas are globally traded commodities. Every time the price of oil increases by a dollar, it ends up costing the Navy and the Marine Corps another 30 million. The Navy hopes that at least half of all fuel used will be biofuel by 2020. Four biofuel companies are set to provide 163 million gallons, priced at 4 dollars a gallon. Although not expanded upon at the event, this initiative forms part of the “Farm to Fleet” program unveiled in December 2013. Although designed to contribute to America’s energy security, provide jobs to rural communities, and ensure a supply of low-cost fuel for the Navy, the program has already proven controversial due to its mounting costs, amounting to hundreds of millions of dollars.

Cost-cutting measures will become increasingly important as the size of the fleet increases. A new amphibious group is set to be ready in the Pacific by 2018, providing Marines – not only those in Darwin, but all over the Pacific – with a spectrum of new options, including an improved resupply capability.

The event concluded with a few interesting tidbits, including on the need for a national debate on the upcoming – and expensive – Trident nuclear missile modernization; the deployment of laser weapons (coming into use this year); and, the F-35C (the SECNAV sees no problem with it being delayed, as the Navy was always the last in priority and the Initial Operating Capability has not changed).

Miha Hribernik is an Asia-Pacific security analyst and researcher, currently working with the Atlas Economic Research Foundation in Washington, DC. He is also an Associate of the European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS) in Brussels. Miha’s research mainly focuses on the foreign and security policy of Japan, and maritime security in East Asia – with an emphasis on counter-piracy information sharing networks such as ReCAAP.

Docs-Union-Pub

CIMSEC’s DC March Meet-Up

Our DC Chapter will be heading to Union Pub near Union Station for our March DC-area informal meet-up/happy hour on Wednesday the 19th. We hope you’ll join us to meet some interesting people and discuss all things maritime. We will also be polling attendees with questions submitted from our audiences. If you have a maritime question you’d like polled, whether related to current events or not, let us know.  

Time: Wednesday, 19 Mar 5:30-9pm; Happy hour 5:00pm-Close
Place: DC Union Pub: 201 Mass Ave NE, Washington, DC
Metro Stop: Union Station (Red Line)

All are welcome – RSVPs not required, but appreciated: director@cimsec.org

 

2652167644_a671031aa6

WarPlan Crimson: The NextWar Schedule

WarPlan Crimson is  the long-view schedule for NextWar and its Sea Control Podcast

NextWar Upcoming Topic Weeks:

Defense Innovation Failures – Mar 24-29
Editor: Matt McLaughlin (matthew.mclaughlin.1(at)gmail.com)
Too little attention is paid to the innovative failures and dead ends. We’re going to fix that.

Private Military Contractors – Apr 14-19
Editor: Emil Maine (emil.maine(at)heritage.org)
Despite their recent pillorying, PMC’s have existed since before the condotierre and will continue to exist after America’s campaigns. We’ll discuss their utility and future.

Wargaming – May 5-10
Editor: Adam Kruppa (adam.kruppa(at)gmail.com)
From the table-top to the joint exercise, how do we mimic the world in ways that is useful (or not) for security and foreign policy?

Theories of Power – May 26-31
Editor: CIMSEC+The Bridge
Writers from The Bridge, CIMSEC, and the academic world discuss their ideas on power and strategy in the military realm.

Sacking of Rome – Jun 16-21
Editor: Paul Pryce (prycep(at)cya-ajc.ca)
The United States is the mightiest power on earth. We spend too much time concentrating on how the U.S. could fail, and less on how Hannibal or the Goths could succeed.

Strategic Communications – Jul 7-12
Editor: Nicolas Di Leonardo (nicolas.a.dileonardo(at)gmail.com)
You keep saying words, I do not think they means what you think they mean… to everyone else.

Sea Control Podcast Schedule:

Mar 10: The Crimean Crisis
Mar 17: TBD
Mar 24: Anthony Arend and Maritime Law
Mar 31: Robert Sutter and Chinese Decision Making
Apr 7: Sea Control Europe
Apr 14: T. Walton and TX Hammes on Navy Doctrine and Escalation
Apr 21: Sea Control Asia-Pacific
Apr 28: Behind the Curtain

Upcoming Projects: Doctrine Man isn’t the ONLY one who can draw pictures! We’re looking for someone or someones who would like to do a weekly comic for CIMSEC on maritime strategy/policy/tech.